What is the best way to improve triggering in pistol?

      
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    “Triggering” is perhaps the most common problem of pistol shooters. No matter at what level you shoot, everyone is still struggling with the “triggering”.

    But what is this problem? Some people think their trigger feels heavy, some feel their trigger finger gets blocked/frozen, some feel the triggering was good yet the shot result is bad and this happens almost always in competitions, sometimes you feel you are pressing the trigger yet the shot doesn’t go off, etc. So is pressing the trigger such a complicated process that we face difficulty doing it? Isn’t it supposed to be a SIMPLE thing – just pull the trigger! How difficult can pulling the trigger be? But yet it is, even for the best of shooters. Has anyone thought why such a simple process feels so difficult under stressful situations? It is because this is not a physical problem that exists in our finger or the trigger, but it is a mental or a psychological problem which ends up affecting the trigger.

    Triggering is not an isolated process. One doesn’t just pull the trigger irrespective of anything else (actually this is how it should be done). We align our sights, stabilise our arm and want to shoot that shot when everything is perfect. But since our arm is always moving, we never get this “PERFECT” feeling and hence triggering becomes very difficult. So this problem of trigger actually starts in our mind – the wish to shoot a perfect shot is the enemy of our triggering.

    Do you realise that you never faced the problem of triggering when you started shooting. As a beginner you could always press the trigger easily but as you got better, the trigger started getting tougher and tougher. And this is because you want to shoot better, and by better I mean a TEN.

    The best way to improve your triggering is to let go of the desire to shoot a ten. We cannot stop the movement of our arm, so we need to accept whatever movement we have (and trust that with training this movement will reduce) and then keep adding pressure on the trigger consistently so that the shot gets fired anywhere within our stability or arc of movement. Sights must be aligned amongst themselves, but do not try to make sure of their position on the target. The moment we try to fix the position of the sights on the target or become too concerned with if we are perfectly in our aiming area, your mind will get distracted and want to stabilise perfectly. This will make movement of the finger or addition of pressure on the trigger very difficult as your mind is now on trying to stabilise your hand perfectly (which rarely happens) and not on adding pressure on the trigger.

    Hence what you actually need to do for good and smooth triggering is to actually forget about the position of sights on the target. Just look at the sights to be sure you are somewhere in your aiming area (don’t need perfect position) and focus on moving the finger. Most shooters focus on sights and wait for the shot to fire on its own and this is a bad habit which never works under pressure.

    So my advice would be to have courage in adding pressure on the trigger smoothly and continuously even if your hand was moving. And trust me, the hand is always steadier than we think it is.

    Good luck!

    Comments

    #1
    Administrator Staff

    “Triggering” is perhaps the most common problem of pistol shooters. No matter at what level you shoot, everyone is still struggling with the “triggering”.

    But what is this problem? Some people think their trigger feels heavy, some feel their trigger finger gets blocked/frozen, some feel the triggering was good yet the shot result is bad and this happens almost always in competitions, sometimes you feel you are pressing the trigger yet the shot doesn’t go off, etc. So is pressing the trigger such a complicated process that we face difficulty doing it? Isn’t it supposed to be a SIMPLE thing – just pull the trigger! How difficult can pulling the trigger be? But yet it is, even for the best of shooters. Has anyone thought why such a simple process feels so difficult under stressful situations? It is because this is not a physical problem that exists in our finger or the trigger, but it is a mental or a psychological problem which ends up affecting the trigger.

    Triggering is not an isolated process. One doesn’t just pull the trigger irrespective of anything else (actually this is how it should be done). We align our sights, stabilize our arm and want to shoot that shot when everything is perfect. But since our arm is always moving, we never get this “PERFECT” feeling and hence triggering becomes very difficult. So this problem of trigger actually starts in our mind – the wish to shoot a perfect shot is the enemy of our triggering.

    Do you realise that you never faced the problem of triggering when you started shooting. As a beginner you could always press the trigger easily but as you got better, the trigger started getting tougher and tougher. And this is because you want to shoot better, and by better I mean a TEN.

    The best way to improve your triggering is to let go of the desire to shoot a ten. We cannot stop the movement of our arm, so we need to accept whatever movement we have (and trust that with training this movement will reduce) and then keep adding pressure on the trigger consistently so that the shot gets fired anywhere within our stability or arc of movement. Sights must be aligned amongst themselves, but do not try to make sure of their position on the target. The moment we try to fix the position of the sights on the target or become too concerned with if we are perfectly in our aiming area, your mind will get distracted and want to stabilize perfectly. This will make movement of the finger or addition of pressure on the trigger very difficult as your mind is now on trying to stabilize your hand perfectly (which rarely happens) and not on adding pressure on the trigger.

    Hence what you actually need to do for good and smooth triggering is to actually forget about the position of sights on the target. Just look at the sights to be sure you are somewhere in your aiming area (don’t need perfect position) and focus on moving the finger. Most shooters focus on sights and wait for the shot to fire on its own and this is a bad habit which never works under pressure.

    So my advice would be to have courage in adding pressure on the trigger smoothly and continuously even if your hand was moving. And trust me, the hand is always steadier than we think it is.

    Good luck!

    Comments

    #2